top of page

Search Results

650 items found for ""

Blog Posts (105)

  • Ready or Not: Garlic Time in the Fall

    This post may contain affiliate links, which means that I may receive a commission if you make a purchase using these links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Planting garlic in the fall is the last garden chores of the season. A small amount of preparation at planting time will give you an abundant garlic harvest without much effort. Garlic is one of the easiest crops you can grow in your garden. It is a long season crop with a unique growing pattern compared to other garden crops. Garlic is planted in fall in order to give it a head start and enough time to produce a larger bulb. How to Plant Garlic in the Fall Planting garlic in the fall allows the roots to begin growing. When winter arrives and the ground freezes, the plants go dormant. Once the soil warms up in the spring, the garlic will start growing again right where it left off. Prepare Your Growing Bed Garlic thrives in full sun and loose soil. Choose a garden bed that has not grown anything in the onion family in the past two years and one that receives an average of at least six hours of sunlight each day. Remove weeds and spread some slow-release organic fertilizer according to the package direction. Add about 2-inches of finished compost and work it in the top 4-6 inches of soil. Plot out your growing bed 4-6 inches in all directions. Dig your holes about 4-inches deep. If you are using the square foot gardening method, plot 6 cloves per square. Divide Your Garlic Seed When you purchase garlic seed, you are actually getting heads of garlic. Garlic is grown from individual cloves. Each clove will grow into a bulb of garlic. Separate your cloves right before planting. Sort out your largest and healthiest looking cloves for planting. If you plant the largest cloves, you will grow larger heads of garlic for next year. Save the smaller and damaged cloves for cooking. Plant Your Garlic Cloves Plant a garlic clove into each hole, with the flat side down and the pointy end up. Cover and firm the soil. Mulch Your Garlic Bed Water the garlic bed well after planting and cover with a light layer of mulch, such as straw or shredded leaves. Aim for about 2-3 inches of mulch to keep the weeds down until the ground freezes. After the ground freezes, add another layer of 2-3 inches of mulch to insulate the soil. This helps prevent the garlic roots from being heaved out of the ground by alternate freezing and thawing. Once the soil warms in spring, you will see green garlic shoots growing through the mulch. If you used an all-purpose organic fertilizer at planting time, your garlic is off to a great start. Water the garlic bed during dry spells when the soil feels dry an inch beneath the surface. Feed with organic fish emulsion fertilizer if the foliage shows signs of stress (yellow tips). Follow the directions on the bottle. If you planted hardneck garlic, you will have an opportunity to harvest garlic scapes a few weeks before the garlic bulb is finished growing. These tender, mildly garlic flavored shoots are delicious.

  • Ready or Not #95: Storing Vegetables

    I was talking to a friend about the soon to be released A Prepared Home food storage calculator and how it was going to be such a big help to figure out what you need in your food storage. She said that she and her daughter sat down and picked out their favorite recipes and started figuring out what food they needed to buy. After a while, she stopped because most everything she loved to cook and to feed her family involved large amounts of fresh fruits and vegetables. Obviously, she can’t store a years’ worth of fresh vegetables; sometimes you are lucky if you can store a week’s worth of fresh vegetables. We talked about alternative storage ideas for vegetables, and these were the best ideas. First, I would suggest buying frozen vegetables. I am a really big fan of frozen vegetables; it doesn’t matter to me if you freeze them yourself or if you buy them frozen. Of course, you will need to consider what you are buying to make sure that it is healthy. If you buy frozen vegetables that are slathered in a delectable, yet unhealthy, sauce you might want to reconsider. But for the most part, frozen vegetables are far superior to canned veggies. The frozen vegetables are processed and frozen within hours after they have been picked so they actually retain more of their nutrients than do the fresh vegetables that have been picked, processed, trucked, and sit on the shelves at the store – slowly deteriorating. I also like the idea that all of the work has already been done and all you have to do is open the bag and pour out the amount that you need, saving the rest in the freezer for a later date – never once worrying about them going bad. I buy my frozen vegetables at Sam’s Club or Costco because they sell them in very large bags. It makes it affordable and convenient. A second alternative is the canned vegetable. I really don’t like canned vegetables very much, but there are some acceptable things about storing canned veggies. Most canned vegetables taste okay and can be eaten without much preparation, except for peas – there should be a law against canned peas. The real upside to canned vegetables is that you can store them for a very long time; you don’t need refrigeration until after you have opened the can and you can transport them the easiest out of all of the alternatives. I especially like to store canned corn, beans, potatoes, mushrooms (I consider the mushrooms a vegetable when it is in a can) and I keep canned carrots on hand for times when I might be desperate enough to use them. A third alternative is sprouting. It is always a good idea to keep seeds on hand for sprouting or growing a garden. Don’t forget to rotate your seeds because they can get old and not work and make sure to always buy good quality seeds. Since it is important to eat fresh food for certain types of nutrients, sprouting can offer you a quick and easy way to get the fresh nutrients in literally days instead of weeks. You will also find that sprouts have more nutritious value than their full-grown counterparts. For example, the broccoli sprout is much more nutritious than the mature broccoli and that is pretty hard to do since broccoli is the most perfect vegetable on the face of the earth. It would be a good thing for you to try sprouting some seeds to see how it is done. There are a lot of instructions on the internet and plenty of books that explain the best way to do it. I will bet that you will fall in love with sprouting and incorporate it into your everyday eating. Remember that there are a whole lot of seeds that can be sprouted – not just alfalfa seeds! Here is a tip for sprouting – use a metal grease splatter shield to sprout your seeds. Just wet the seeds down and spread them on to the shield. Lay it on top of moist paper towels next to the sink. When they start to sprout and are clinging to the metal screen, you can just wet them down and let them drain all while perched over the sink. The sprouts are easy to detach and eat and the shield can be thrown into the dishwasher when you’re done. Too easy. Dried vegetables are also an acceptable way of storing vegetables, but before you go out and buy a bunch, try them out first. I found that some brands taste really good and some would be better used as fertilizer to grow the fresh stuff. Make sure that the money you spend to purchase and store your vegetables is money put to good use, that of buying high quality food for the good health of your family.

  • Ready or Not #94: Re-assess Food Storage

    My daughter gave me a cookbook by Zonya Foco, of “Zonya’s Health Bites” on PBS, for Christmas and I have been reading it, yes reading it, and I have really enjoyed it. (I have to say that I haven’t really read my Better Homes and Garden cookbook – I mostly just leaf through it). The reason that I like this cookbook so much is that she likes to cook like me – only she does it healthier. She isn’t into slaving over the stove for hours, but she is into presenting well-balanced meals that are appealing, healthy and quick. But the most important thing about how she cooks is that it is food storage friendly, very food storage friendly. In fact, at the back of the book there is a shopping list of foods that she suggests you have on hand at all times so that you can cook her meals quickly. She has one minute meals, five minute meals, 30 minute meals and slow cooker feasts. Basically, she has done all of your work for you; she gives you a shopping list, point by point on how to cook each meal and she doesn’t make you slave over the stove day and night – I really like her! This is such a good time of year to evaluate (or re-evaluate) your food storage because there aren’t any major holidays looming ahead. You now have time to analyze what you need to do to bring your food storage up to standard – one year’s supply of food and dry good sundry – including clothes and such. If you are going to make this work, then you are going to have to make specific plans. There are several ways that you can decide to take this on. One really quick way is to take your top 15 favorite recipes, multiply all of the ingredients by two and then again by 12 – then go buy however much your calculations say to buy. Remember, you don’t have to purchase it all at once. Wait for sales or just pick up a case here and there, whenever you go grocery shopping, and let it add up – it will add up quicker than you expect. Make sure that you have your 15 favorite breakfast, lunch, and dinner recipes – unless you only want to eat one meal a day. Another way to decide on what to store is to get online and download a list of what different agencies have determined to be the items that you need to survive for a year. After you get those items stored, you can spice your storage up by purchasing additional foodstuffs (e.g., mushrooms, olives, spices, and more) to make the meals that you create a little more fun and inviting. Remember, you want to build your food storage in such a way that you and your family will enjoy it when you use it – which should be an ongoing everyday thing. This is a really good time to talk about rotation. Remember that you should be using what you buy and then replacing it, always making sure that your food storage will be fresh, usable, and palatable. Remember – R&R, rotate and replenish. We will soon have A Prepared Home food storage calculator that will be extremely useful in managing and maintaining your storage. Good luck with your re-assessing endeavor!

View All

Other Pages (542)

  • FLAVORED KOMBUCHA

    < Back FLAVORED KOMBUCHA Prep Time: 2 Minutes Cook Time: 3 Minutes Serves: 8 Level: Beginner About the Recipe Flavored Kombucha is a fermented drink that is a delicious treat and easy to make! This flavored Kombucha recipe uses fruit for a variety of flavors. Even kids love it! Ingredients 1 - 2 quarts kombucha ⅓ - ½ cup fruit fresh or frozen Kombucha is very forgiving so don't worry about being too exact in how much to use. Preparation Once your kombucha has finished fermenting, remove the desired amount and add it to a jar with a lid. Add fruit to the kombucha, screw on the top and let sit for two days to a week - depending on the flavor you like. When the second fermentation is finished, place kombucha in the refrigerator, chill and enjoy! Previous Next

  • Turkey Bone Broth

    < Back Turkey Bone Broth Prep Time: 10 min Cook Time: 12 to 24 hours Serves: 8 Level: Beginner About the Recipe ​ Ingredients For the Broth… 2 lbs. carcasses and mixed bones (your left over holiday turkey) 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 2 1/2 quarts cold water Optional Veggies… 1 medium onion (with skin, chopped in half) (optional) 1 bulb garlic (with peel, cut in half) (optional) 2 stalks celery (with leaves, roughly chopped) (optional) 1 carrot (with ends, unpeeled, roughly chopped) (optional) Optional Herbs… 1 bay leaf (optional) 1/2 bunch fresh parsley (optional) 1 or 2 sprigs fresh thyme (optional) 3 or 4 teaspoons rubbed sage (optional) Preparation Place the bones in a large crockpot along with the vinegar and water. Add the veggies and herbs, and let sit for 30 minutes so the vinegar can begin pulling the goodness from the bones. (This is not a huge deal; if you start your stock at night before you go to bed and don't want to wait, just omit this step.) Set the cooker on low and cook for 12 to 24 hours. The next day, strain the stock in a colander. Put the stock in the refrigerator to allow the fat to rise and solidify on the top (see recipe notes below). Skim the fat (save it in zippered bags in the fridge or freezer for gravies and for flavoring meals). Separate the stock into cup-size portions and freeze in zip-lock bags for future use. You can also bottle the broth for your storage. Previous Next

  • Vegan Honey (maltose syrup made from wheat grass)

    < Back Vegan Honey (maltose syrup made from wheat grass) Prep Time: 6 Days Cook Time: 2 Hours Serves: 24 Level: Beginner About the Recipe In this step-by-step guide, we will walk you through the process of making vegan honey using cat grass seeds and glutinous rice. Ingredients 2 Large shallow trays (Ideally use 2 seed sprouter trays.) Cheesecloth 1 Spray bottle Rice Cooker 1 Large pan 3 Mason jars (I used 3 8-oz mason jars to store my homemade vegan honey. You can also use a 24-oz large mason jar.) 1 Food thermometer (Optional) Preparation Step-by-step INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Place the wheat grass seeds in a bowl of water and let them soak for about 12 hours. This will help speed up germination. 2. Rinse a piece of cheesecloth under running water, gently squeeze out the water so that the cheesecloth is damp. Lay the cheesecloth flat on a tray or shallow dish . Evenly sprinkle the soaked cat grass seeds over the surface of the cheesecloth. Gently place a layer of kitchen paper over the seeds, allowing some space for air circulation. This helps retain moisture for germination. (For the best result, you can use a seed sprouter tray with a lid and small holes on the bottom . If so, the cheesecloth and kitchen paper is not needed). 3. Twice a day , remove the kitchen paper and thoroughly wet the seeds by spraying water over them. After you wet the seeds, carefully lift up the cheesecloth (with seeds on it) from the tray and rinse the tray under running water, then carefully place the cheesecloth back on the tray, covering the kitchen paperback. (It’s important to keep the tray clean and not to let the cheesecloth sit in water to prevent mold or rot.) 4. The growing duration can vary depending on the season and room temperature. In my experience during the summer, it took approximately 5 days for wheat grass seeds to reach a height of 2 inches . Once the wheat grass reaches this height, wash, drain, and soak 5½ cups of glutinous rice in 6 cups of water overnight . 5. The following day, transfer the soaked glutinous rice along with the soaking water into a rice cooker . Choose the “rice” mode and cook the rice until it is completely done. 6. Once the glutinous rice has finished cooking, remove the lid of the rice cooker and fluff the rice using a spoon . This will help it cool down more quickly. 7. Harvest the wheat grass. Make sure to carefully preserve the roots as you pull the wheat grass off the cheesecloth. The roots contain a great amount of enzymes, so it’s important to keep them intact. 8. Thoroughly rinse the wheatgrass multiple times, at the same time remove any spoiled or non-germinated seeds. 9. Use a food processor or a knife to chop the wheat grass and its roots as fine as possible . 10. Once the cooked glutinous rice has been cooled to 60℃/140℉ , add the chopped wheatgrass into the rice cooker. Thoroughly blend them together with clean hands. (If you don’t have a thermometer, you can touch the glutinous rice with your finger, at 60 ℃, it would feel hot, but not unendurably hot .) 11. Place the lid on the rice cooker, choose the “keep warm” mode , and set a timer for 5 hours. (If your rice cooker doesn’t have the keep warm function, you can also place the pot into an oven and set its temperature at 60℃/140℉ for 5 hours.) 12. Set a fine mesh straining bag (or 3 layers of cheesecloth) over a large pan , pour the glutinous rice and wheat grass mixture into the bag. Lift the bag and squeeze it repeatedly to extract as much liquid as possible. Discard the solids remaining inside. 13. Simmer the liquid over medium heat for approximately one and a half hours until it transforms into a syrupy consistency or until the overall temperature reaches 105℃/220℉ . During the first hour, intermittently stir the mixture using a spatula. In the last half hour, increase the frequency of stirring to prevent the bottom from burning. 14. Use a fine mesh skimmer to remove any floating foam. Transfer your homemade vegan honey into sanitized Mason jars. Let the syrup cool to room temperature before tightly closing the lid of the Mason jar. Place the wheat grass seeds in a bowl of water and let them soak for about 12 hours. This will help speed up germination. Rinse a piece of cheesecloth under running water, gently squeeze out the water so that the cheesecloth is damp. Lay the cheesecloth flat on a tray or shallow dish . Evenly sprinkle the soaked cat grass seeds over the surface of the cheesecloth. Gently place a layer of kitchen paper over the seeds, allowing some space for air circulation. This helps retain moisture for germination. (For the best result, you can use a seed sprouter tray with a lid and small holes on the bottom . If so, the cheesecloth and kitchen paper is not needed). Twice a day , remove the kitchen paper and thoroughly wet the seeds by spraying water over them. After you wet the seeds, carefully lift up the cheesecloth (with seeds on it) from the tray and rinse the tray under running water, then carefully place the cheesecloth back on the tray, covering the kitchen paperback. (It's important to keep the tray clean and not to let the cheesecloth sit in water to prevent mold or rot.) The growing duration can vary depending on the season and room temperature. In my experience during the summer, it took approximately 5 days for wheat grass seeds to reach a height of 2 inches . Once the wheat grass reaches this height, wash, drain, and soak 5½ cups of glutinous rice in 6 cups of water overnight . The following day, transfer the soaked glutinous rice along with the soaking water into a rice cooker . Choose the "rice" mode and cook the rice until it is completely done. Once the glutinous rice has finished cooking, remove the lid of the rice cooker and fluff the rice using a spoon . This will help it cool down more quickly. Harvest the wheat grass. Make sure to carefully preserve the roots as you pull the wheat grass off the cheesecloth. The roots contain a great amount of enzymes, so it's important to keep them intact. Thoroughly rinse the wheatgrass multiple times, at the same time remove any spoiled or non-germinated seeds. Use a food processor or a knife to chop the wheat grass and its roots as fine as possible . Once the cooked glutinous rice has been cooled to 60℃/140℉ , add the chopped wheatgrass into the rice cooker. Thoroughly blend them together with clean hands. (If you don't have a thermometer, you can touch the glutinous rice with your finger. At 60 ℃, it would feel hot, but not unendurably hot .) Place the lid on the rice cooker, choose the "keep warm" mode , and set a timer for 5 hours. (If your rice cooker doesn't have the keep warm function, you can also place the pot into an oven and set its temperature at 60℃/140℉ for 5 hours.) Set a fine mesh straining bag (or 3 layers of cheesecloth) over a large pan , pour the glutinous rice and wheat grass mixture into the bag. Lift the bag and squeeze it repeatedly to extract as much liquid as possible. Discard the solids remaining inside. Simmer the liquid over medium heat for approximately one and a half hours until it transforms into a syrupy consistency or until the overall temperature reaches 105℃/220℉. During the first hour, intermittently stir the mixture using a spatula. In the last half hour, increase the frequency of stirring to prevent the bottom from burning. Use a fine mesh skimmer to remove any floating foam. Transfer your homemade vegan honey into sanitized Mason jars. Let the syrup cool to room temperature before tightly closing the lid of the Mason jar. Did you know that you can make vegan honey at home from wheat grass , or even cat grass? That’s right! By combining cat grass , a popular snack for your feline companion, with glutinous rice , you can easily produce a delectable and naturally sweet vegan honey alternative. This process doesn’t require the involvement of bees and results in a delightful, smooth texture that will surely satisfy your taste buds. In this step-by-step guide , we will walk you through the process of creating your very own homemade vegan honey using simple, everyday ingredients and techniques . Summarization of the recipe: Begin by soaking the wheat grass seeds to aid in germination, then spread them on damp cheesecloth. Spritz the seeds with water twice a day, rinsing the tray to prevent mold. Once the wheat grass is about 2 inches tall, soak glutinous rice and cook it before adding finely chopped wheatgrass. Let it blend in the rice cooker on “keep warm” mode for 5 hours. Strain the mixture, simmer the liquid until syrupy at 105℃/220℉, and transfer it to sanitized Mason jars. Allow the honey to cool before sealing the jars. Get ready to indulge in your own delicious, naturally sweet vegan honey creation! What is vegan honey? In general, vegan honey refers to a honey substitute or alternative that is made without the involvement of bees or any animal-derived ingredients. Vegan honey alternatives can be made from various sources such as fruits, flowers, or plant extracts. These alternatives aim to mimic the taste, texture, and sweetness of traditional honey. In this current recipe, our homemade vegan honey is actually maltose syrup, which has a rich, caramel-like sweetness and a smooth and viscous texture, just like honey. It is produced by breaking down the starches in malted grains into simpler sugars, primarily maltose. The roles of wheat grass and glutinous rice The two important ingredients in this recipe are wheat grass and glutinous rice Wheat grass and roots are rich in enzymes , particularly amylase, which plays a crucial role in breaking down starches into simpler sugars. The germination process of wheat grass activates these enzymes, making it an ideal source for extracting maltose. The enzymes in wheatgrass initiate the conversion of starches in glutinous rice into maltose during the fermentation process. Fun fact : Human saliva contains amylase too, which plays a role in the initial digestion of starches in the mouth. That’s why when you chew on rice for a prolonged period, you may experience a subtle sweetness in your mouth. Glutinous rice , also known as sticky rice or sweet rice, contains a high amount of amylopectin, a type of starch. The amylase in wheat grass breaks down the starches in glutinous rice, resulting in the production of maltose syrup. Tips for making vegan honey at home 1. Choose rice with a high starch content The starches in rice is one of the key ingredients in this recipe. Therefore, choosing rice varieties with a higher starch content will result in a sweeter and thicker end product. For optimal results, it is recommended to use glutinous rice (also known as sticky rice or sweet rice) in this recipe. However, if glutinous rice is not available, you can also substitute it with other high-starch rice varieties like sushi rice , Arborio rice , Calrose rice , or Jasmine rice . Try not to use Basmati rice , as it has a lower starch content compared to the previously mentioned varieties, resulting in a lighter taste and texture when used for making vegan honey. 2. Use cat grass seeds The most commonly used cat grass seeds come from varieties such as oat grass, wheatgrass, rye, and barley grass. All these seeds contain a great amount of amylase when they germinate. So, regardless of the specific type of cat grass seeds you have, you can use them for making vegan honey with no problem. 3. Grow cat grass for making vegan honey Growing cat grass at home can be incredibly easy, requiring minimal effort. One convenient method is to cultivate it on a shallow tray, using cheesecloth as a lining, eliminating the need for soil. To grow cat grass for vegan honey, it is important to loosely cover the seeds with kitchen paper to block direct sunshine . There are some main reasons: Moisture retention : Direct sunlight can cause the soil to dry out quickly. By covering the seeds, you create a microclimate that helps retain moisture, promoting better germination and early growth. Protection from overheating : Intense sunlight can generate excessive heat, which may be detrimental to the germination process. By providing a cover, you shield the seeds from potential overheating, creating a more favorable environment for their development. Minimize chlorophyll production : covering the grass can inhibit the production of chlorophyll, which has a earthy and leafy taste. By minimizing chlorophyll production in the grass, we can enhance the purity of our vegan honey’s taste. An additional crucial suggestion is to daily rinse and drain any excess water from the tray to maintain cleanliness and prevent the occurrence of mold or rot. For the best result, you can use a seed sprouter tray so that the cat grass’s roots won’t sit in water . 4. Monitor the temperature The optimal temperature for the activity of amylase derived from wheat grass is between 50 to 70 ℃ ( 122 to 158 ℉ ). These enzymes are often classified as thermophilic or heat-tolerant, meaning they can function effectively at higher temperatures. But when the temperature is higher than 80 ℃ ( 176 ℉ ), the enzyme’s structure can become disrupted, leading to a loss of its catalytic activity. Therefore, it is important to ensure that you let the cooked glutinous rice cool to approximately 60℃/140℉ before incorporating the chopped wheatgrass through blending. Additionally, ensure that the temperature setting of your rice cooker is within the range of 50 to 70 ℃ (122 to 158 ℉) when utilizing the “keep warm” mode. If you don’t have a rice cooker, you can set your oven at 60℃/140℉ or use the oven “keep warm” mode. 5. Texture of finished vegan honey Once finished thickening, the texture of vegan honey should be slightly lighter than store-bought bottled honey, as it will turn thicker after it’s cooled. You can keep track of the temperature using a food thermometer . The desired temperature range for thickened vegan honey should fall between 105 to 110 ℃ (221 to 230 ℉ ). Before taking the temperature measurement, it’s advisable to give the mixture a thorough stir to ensure an accurate reading, as there may be some variations in temperature within the mixture. If you don’t have a food thermometer, you can simply do a V Shape Test using a spatula. Use a spatula to scoop up some liquid from the pan. The liquid should be maintained without falling , it should naturally form a 1-2 inch V shape on the edge of the spatula. At this point, the vegan honey has been thickened into the desired texture. 6. Storage of homemade vegan honey While the liquid is still hot, transfer it into sanitized Mason jars. Avoiding direct sunlight, homemade vegan honey can be stored at room temperature for up to 2 months . It can be stored in the fridge for up to 1 year . But it will turn hard or crystallize when stored in the fridge. However, this change in texture does not indicate spoilage or a loss of quality. Crystallized vegan honey can be easily restored to a liquid state by gently heating it. You can place the jar of crystallized honey in warm water, and stir until it becomes smooth again. EQUIPMENT for making vegan honey: 2 Large shallow trays (Ideally use 2 seed sprouter trays.) Cheesecloth 1 Spray bottle Rice Cooker 1 Large pan 3 Mason jars (I used 3 8-oz mason jars to store my homemade vegan honey. You can also use a 24-oz large mason jar.) 1 Food thermometer (Optional) INGREDIENTS List: 1½ cup Wheat grass seeds (300g) 5½ cup glutinous rice (1200g; Can also use regular white rice . But glutinous rice contains higher starch content , resulting in a shinier appearance and sweeter taste for the homemade vegan honey.) 6 cup cold water (1400ml; for soaking and cooking the glutinous rice) NOTES 1. Storage of homemade vegan honey Avoiding direct sunlight, homemade vegan honey can be stored at room temperature for up to 2 months . It can be stored in the fridge for up to 1 year . But it will turn hard or crystallize when stored in the fridge. However, this change in texture does not indicate spoilage or a loss of quality. Crystallized vegan honey can be easily restored to a liquid state by gently heating it. You can place the jar of crystallized honey in warm water, and stir until it becomes smooth again. 2. Usage of homemade vegan honey Our homemade vegan honey is actually maltose syrup, also known as malt syrup or malt extract, is a sweetener commonly used in various culinary applications. Here are some common uses: Baking: vegan honey can be used as a sweetener in baking recipes, such as bread, cakes, cookies, and pastries. It adds a mild sweetness and helps to enhance flavor and moisture in baked goods. Confectionery: vegan honey is widely used in the production of candies, toffees, caramels, and other confectionery items. It provides sweetness, texture, and a desirable chewy consistency. Brewing: vegan honey is an essential ingredient in beer brewing. It is derived from malted barley and provides fermentable sugars for yeast during the fermentation process, contributing to the production of alcohol and carbonation. Cooking and Sauces: vegan honey can be used as a sweetener in cooking various dishes, such as stir-fries, glazes, marinades, and sauces. It adds a unique sweet and savory flavor profile to dishes. Asian Cuisine: vegan honey is commonly used in Chinese and other Asian cuisines. It is an essential ingredient in dishes like Peking duck, char siu (barbecue pork), and mooncakes. Ice Cream and Desserts: vegan honey can be incorporated into ice cream, frozen desserts, and sweet sauces to add sweetness, flavor, and a smooth texture. Previous Next

View All
bottom of page